Revised Version of the Hippocratic Oath. Azonto Style.

This is the original, modern version, which we must admit, does not apply to our situation in Ghana.

I swear to fulfill, to the best of my ability and judgment, this covenant:

I will respect the hard-won scientific gains of those physicians in whose steps I walk, and gladly share such knowledge as is mine with those who are to follow.

I will apply, for the benefit of the sick, all measures [that] are required, avoiding those twin traps of overtreatment and therapeutic nihilism.

I will remember that there is art to medicine as well as science, and that warmth, sympathy, and understanding may outweigh the surgeon’s knife or the chemist’s drug.

I will not be ashamed to say “I know not,” nor will I fail to call in my colleagues when the skills of another are needed for a patient’s recovery.

I will respect the privacy of my patients, for their problems are not disclosed to me that the world may know. Most especially must I tread with care in matters of life and death.

If it is given me to save a life, all thanks. But it may also be within my power to take a life; this awesome responsibility must be faced with great humbleness and awareness
of my own frailty. Above all, I must not play at God.

I will remember that I do not treat a fever chart, a cancerous growth, but a sick human being, whose illness may affect the person’s family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related
problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick.

I will prevent disease whenever I can, for prevention is preferable to cure.

I will remember that I remain a member of society, with special obligations to all my fellow human beings, those sound of mind and body as well as the infirm.

If I do not violate this oath, may I enjoy life and art, respected while I live and remembered with affection thereafter. May I always act so as to preserve the finest traditions of my calling and may I long experience the joy of healing those who
seek my help.

By popular request, here’s the Azonto remix.

I swear to fulfill, to the best of my ability and judgment, depending on my financial situation because ahbe you know, life is hard in Ghana, this covenant:

I will respect the hard-won scientific gains of those physicians in whose steps I walk when it suits me,
and gladly share such knowledge as is mine with those who are to follow.

I will apply, for the benefit of the sick who can afford it , all
measures [that] are required, avoiding those twin traps of overtreatment and therapeutic nihilism.

I will remember that there is art to
medicine as well as science, and that warmth, sympathy, and understanding may outweigh the surgeon’s knife or the chemist’s drug again, for those who can afford it, or when the government pays me because life is hard in Ghana oh.

I will not be ashamed to say “I know not,” nor will I fail to call in my colleagues when the skills of another are needed for a patient’s recovery.

I will respect the privacy of my patients, for their problems are not disclosed to me that the world may know, unless the world or my friends and family really want to know . Most especially must I
tread with care in matters of life and death.

If it is given me to save a life, all thanks. But it may also be within my power to take a life; this awesome responsibility must be faced with great humbleness and awareness
of my own frailty. Above all, I must not play at God except when threatening the government with a strike.

I will remember that I do not treat a fever chart, a cancerous growth, but a sick human being, whose illness may affect the person’s family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related
problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick.

I will prevent disease whenever I can, for prevention is preferable to cure. I will remember that I remain a member of society, with special obligations to all my fellow human beings, those sound of mind and body as well as the infirm.

If I do not violate this oath, may I enjoy life and art, respected while I live and remembered with affection thereafter. May I always act so as to preserve the finest traditions of my calling and may I long experience the joy of healing those who seek my help.

On Nana Oye Lithur, those Pastors and Members of Parliament

The ongoing Gay Rights ‘Debate’ in Ghana really annoys me.

First of all, most of the people debating don’t even know what these Gay Rights are… Either that, or they are intentionally being obtuse.
More importantly, I really wish that as a country, we would direct all the passion that the subject of homosexuality inspires in our innocent and pious hearts towards something that’s more important… like… hmm let me see… Oh, here’s a thought… we could passionately seek solutions to our electricity and water problems!

Unfortunately, this wish of mine will probably never come true, and my attempt to ignore the stupidity that the debate in its various manifestations inevitably reveals has failed. Once Again.

This example of Gay Rights inspired stupidity has been worrying me for a long time. When I saw a news article about an Association of Pastors against the appointment of Nana Oye Lithur, I was rather shocked, which is weird, because there’s not much a pastor in Ghana can do that will shock me. I also listened, with increasing incredulity, to a radio discussion where some NPP members of Parliament complained about the appointment of Nana Oye Lithur and how we (Ghana) would incur the wrath of God if she wasn’t removed immediately.

First Question: Is Nana Oye Lithur that good?
Does she have a superpower we haven’t been told about? Perhaps some super mind-control wave thingy that she will use to force the pastors and MPs to have a super gay orgy? No? Or does the Minister of Gender, Children and Social Protection have the authority to pass laws? Why are they so worried about her appointment?!

Second Question: Why won’t the MPs just pass a law against the damn thing?
Or at least amend the existing law. The law on unnatural carnal knowledge is not very direct ( we have been told). Fortunately for them, MPs on both sides of the house are united in their hatred for homosexuals, so how hard is it to simply do their job… you know… The one we pay them GhC7200.00 for.

Third Question: Why are some pastors so darn stupid?
You would think they would form an Association against Corruption, Or Spouse Abuse, or Rape or something.

I’ll stop here. If I continue, I might just say exactly what I think about these pastors.

GHANA REALLY WANTS TO RISE

Somewhere last week, during @BloggingGhana Twitter Debate, a question came up. “Can Ghana Do Without The USA?” or something like that. I answered with a “Certainly”, and earned the following response “I do not know you, but I can wager you are either 1. A fresh university graduate 2. Not a frequent traveler.” I chuckled and retweeted, and asked why she would think that. I’m still waiting for an answer, so let me do some wagering too. And oh, before I forget to mention, this blog post is inspired by a comment from a friend about the incident, apparently, that comment, hmm… it was a great punchline… Hmmm

Now back to my wagering. I do not know her, but I can wager she read my bio and saw “freshly minted architect”. I guess she doesn’t know that to be an architect in Ghana, you would have to have a second degree at least. So yes, I’m a fresh architect, with a Master of Architecture degree. My thesis was all about an African Architectural Renaissance, and I’ve done the research, but I won’t dwell on that. I also won’t dwell on the fact that I’ve been working for three years now and mostly catering for myself with my own money. (Don’t let this young face fool you oh, lol) I can wager she assumed that I was a green girl with wobbly knees and an unrealistic outlook on life. Point number two made me laugh more, the one about not being a frequent traveler, because I can wager I know exactly where she’s coming from. I know because I’ve been there, and many people are still there, but I’ll come to that later. I can wager that she doesn’t consider someone who has traveled extensively within her own country as well traveled, so I won’t dwell on that.

As for my aburokyire experience, my memories of Malaysia are almost all gone. All I remember is this delicious banana dessert I had. I can wager she didn’t know I had a daddy-sponsored stint in Chicago & New York & Ann Arbor ( and I went to see Frank Lloyd Wright’s Falling Water) but I won’t dwell on that. Now that I’m done wagering, I’ll move to the things I want to dwell on.

GHANA REALLY WANTS TO RISE

No offence to my aburokyire trained sistren and brethren, but I have this dream of seeing Ghana being moved forward by people that had all their training here. I hate it when people talk like the educational system here is so terrible, like nothing good can come out of it. I’m something good, I’ve come out of it, and I have several friends like me!
When Osaagyefo started the program of taking people out of Ghana to study in the USA and the UK, the intention was that they go and learn and bring the knowledge home… bring the knowledge home to lift Ghana up to similar levels, not come home and work their butts off (arguably) so as to be able to afford school fees in the US & Europe for their kids. I don’t hate the West, but damn it I want Ghana to improve! I’m fighting very hard, fighting against the urge to run off and go do my doctorate somewhere in aburokyire….(another post, maybe) I hate the mental slavery that exists in our minds, the mental slavery that makes us ‘respect’ people who have just landed and treat them differently. I hate the mental slavery that makes people struggle to make money, struggle for a visa, go to aburokyire and take pictures at some mall bi , upload these pictures on Facebook and then come home and ‘flex’. Can the ‘borga’ word just fade away already?! I hate the mental slavery that makes people think nothing good can be found here, that my country cannot move forward, that as for Ghana dier…. I want to feel proud to be Ghanaian every single day, not just when the Black Stars are playing. I don’t want everyone in Ghana to be rich, well-educated and happy. I don’t even think that’s possible. I just want some equity, I just want people to have a chance, a choice…

When I say I believe that Ghana can do without the USA, I’m not saying we should. I’m saying we can. We can survive without aid, we can stay here and get a good education, we can move our country forward. We can if we want to. And if you think we can’t, then please, for goodness sake, move out of the country quickly. If you’re not here, don’t come back, because Ghana really wants to rise.